All posts filed under: inspiration

The only family you choose

God gives us our relatives. Thank God we can choose our friends. Ethel Watts Mumford wasn’t wrong, but there is one relative we choose. Only one. Obviously, it’s not our parents. Parents are the riskiest genetic lottery everyone plays before birth, where you hit the jackpot if you get just normal people who love you and are able to raise you into a decent human being. It’s not our children. I don’t have kids myself but all of my friends say their children were “like a box of chocolates, you never know what you’re gonna get”. It’s definitely not our siblings. God knows how two same people can sometimes produce two very different offsprings. My sister and I may look somewhat alike but our characters are anything but. I also have bigger breasts, ha! It is certainly not the wider family with all the grandparents, aunts and uncles, nieces and nephews, cousins and all the many in-laws. Don’t even get me started on that lot. The only relative we ever truly choose is a partner. The one …

What I learnt from two days of digital detox

Two weeks ago during the long Easter weekend, I went offline for a couple of days. I still had my phone with me but reduced its use to the most basic functions – making and answering calls and text messages, checking directions and weather forecast and searching information when I needed it. And that was it. No camera, no social media, no online shopping. Before I started, I thought it would be difficult and I would have withdrawal symptoms. Nope. It was surprisingly easy. It has now been two weeks since normal digital use resumed but I am already looking forward to my next weekend offline. Because here are the key five things I’ve learnt from the two days of digital detox. I have more time than I thought. In the two days of staying away from my phone, I: finished two books; read one new book; fixed three buttons on two garments; tried two new recipes; wrote to two friends to catch up; made a haircut appointment; paid off and closed a credit card; …

A letter to myself on cloudy days

No one is ever always happy. There are and there will be days when there’s a nagging feeling that something isn’t quite right even though all is good on the surface, It may be a feeling that you’re stuck in life when everyone is going full speed to their happy places. Or it may be a quiet thought that you’re not as good as you think you are. I mean, otherwise you would have surely got that promotion, started that new business, earned lots of money, moved countries, bought a house where you can have two cats, wouldn’t you? It may be just a realisation that you’ve not achieved as much as you hoped. And that you never will achieve much because just look around – it’s tough out there. It may be that inner critic whispering all the what-ifs into your ear. What if it’s the best you’ll ever have? What if wishing for better is wishful thinking for a loser like you? What if you’re too ordinary to dream big? It may be …

The Surprising Thing People Talk About Most in Therapy – by Katherine Schafler

Taken from Thrive Global. (Hint: you’re probably doing it right now). So, whenever someone calls me, I become confused. Why are they calling? Is something wrong? Is it my birthday today? And I just sort of stare at the phone until it goes to voicemail. Then I text later, ‘did you call?’ so we can have our conversation over text, which is obviously the civilized thing to do. But of course, we all have our tiny handful of people that we bestow with the ironic but ultimate gesture of modern affection: talking to on the good ole’ fashioned phone. Among my tiny handful is one of my best friends; when she calls and I’m not able to pick up, she leaves a full on conversation on my voicemail as if I’m on the other end of the phone. If the voicemail cuts her off because she’s been talking for 6 minutes, she calls back and starts another message with, “Hey, something’s wrong with your voicemail, anyway, so then…” This is an ordinary thing she does …

9 Phrases You Should Stop Saying if You Want to Be Happy and Successful – by Elle Kaplan

Article taken from Thrive Global. Change your vocabulary and you can completely change your success. Language matters. The right words can motivate you to take your happiness and success to the next level — but the wrong ones can stand in your way. Studies have even found that using positive or negative language can change your brain by impacting the expression of genes that regulate physical and emotional stress. Even more importantly, it’s been discovered that we say that we say 300 to 1,000 words to ourselves every single minute. If you’re practicing negative self-talk, that’s a lot of negative words being thrown your way. If you’re serious about moving toward success in every aspect of your life — including your words — read on for nine phrases you should eliminate from your vocabulary. 1) “This has to be perfect.” American journalist, activist, author of six best-selling books Maria Shriver once said, “Perfectionism doesn’t make you feel perfect; it makes you feel inadequate.” Often, we strive for perfection because we seek approval and praise from others. When we obsess over …

“I want to say to all the young women out there…”

I’m neutral about Taylor Swift’s music, so the only thing that made my day when she won 2016’s ‘Album of the Year’ at Grammys was her acceptance speech. I want to say to all the young women out there: There are going to be people along the way who try to undercut your success or take credit for your accomplishments or your fame. But if you just focus on the work and you don’t let those people sidetrack you, someday, when you get where you’re going, you will look around and you will know — it was you, and the people who love you, who put you there. And that will be the greatest feeling in the world. As a young woman, I can relate. It’s daunting sometimes to push yourself to keep going when your environment tells you that you’re not good enough or makes false promises. But you have to. Not to prove them they’re wrong.but to prove yourself you’re right. But to prove yourself you’re right.